Dear Family,

 Army Letters from an Officer’s Wife, 1871 – 1888 simply states this a book of letters. Yet, I’ve wondered, is it really a compilation of letters or not? In the late 19th and early 20th century, many military wives published their personal journals with book entries similarly formatted like Army Letters… Today I came across very interesting news about Army Letters that gives credence…

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Life is either a daring Adventure or nothing

         Let Us Have Faith Security is mostly a superstition.  It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing. To keep our faces toward change…

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The Indians call them Buffalo Soldiers

  Camp Supply, Indian Territory, May 1872: There are more troops here than at Fort Lyon, and of course the post is very much larger. There are two troops of colored cavalry, one of white cavalry, and three companies of infantry. […] The officers say that the negroes make good soldiers and fight like fiends[…]…

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“Where’s Frances?” Arlington National Cemetery Update

“It is the feeling of loneliness I mind here—of being lost and no one to search for me.”    Frances M.A. Roe.  Army Letters from an Officer’s Wife, 1871-1888. Soon after returning from Arlington National Cemetery, I couldn’t help but wonder “where’s Frances?” I dug out the Roe file which includes both Frances and Fayette’s…

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Mrs. Rae’s Indians

Camp Supply, Indian Territory, May 1872 – January 1873 This place is quite dreadful as it has been represented to us. There are more troops here than at Fort Lyon, and of course the post is very much larger. There are two troops of colored cavalry, one of white cavalry, and three companies of infantry[…]…

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We are in the Heart of Indian Country

Cimarron Redoubt, Kansas, January 1873. Two or three days ago Powder-Face came to make a formal call upon the “White Chief.” […] He is an Indian of striking personality—is rather tall, with square, broad shoulders, and the poise of his head tells one at once that he is not an ordinary savage.   We must…

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Sandbag Castle on the Plains

Cimarron Redoubt, Kansas, January 1873. As soon as I heard of the order I announced that I was coming, but it was necessary to obtain the commanding officer’s permission first. This seemed rather hopeless for a time, the general declaring I would “die in such a hole,” where I could have no comforts, but he did…

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Fort Lyon – Colorado Territory

October 1871 After months of anticipation and days of weary travel we have at last got to our army home! The day was glorious, and the atmosphere so clear, we could see miles and miles in every direction. But there was not one object to be seen on the vast rolling plains–not a tree nor a…

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